Godly Play

What is Godly Play?

Godly Play is a program of Christian spiritual formation that teaches children how to use the Christian language--parable, sacred story, liturgical action and silence—to become more aware of the mystery of God’s presence in their lives. The goal of Godly Play is to show how to be open to the Holy Spirit, the Creator, and the Redeemer all at once and all the time in every place.

When Christian language is learned by the Godly Play approach, it is a means to know God and to make meaning of our lives. Each of the stories of God’s people is told in a way that connects with the child’s own experience and relationship with God. Godly Play respects the innate spirituality of children and encourages curiosity and imagination in experiencing the mystery and joy of God.

The classroom has a threshold which serves a similar purpose to the narthex in the sanctuary, letting us know that we are entering sacred space. The “center” of the room is the focal table, where we see the cross and the Holy Family. It is framed by the two “I am” statements: “I am the Good Shepherd” and “I am the light.”

Story shelves line the room and are organized by language: sacred stories from the Hebrew and Greek Scriptures, liturgical stories (such as Advent and Baptism), and parables. There also are shelves with arts and crafts materials and a work area for the response time.


The order of worship in Godly Play is intentional and reflects the activities in the sanctuary. When children join the congregation for intergenerational worship on communion Sundays, they grow in their understanding of corporate worship as a result of their experience in Godly Play.  If you would to know more about Godly Play at Clayton Valley Presbyterian church, contact Kathleen Krentz at at 925-935-5595 or Kathleen.krentz@krentz.biz.                                                                                                                                                                                                           

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The classroom is painted in the bright liturgical colors of the church seasons, with story materials neatly arranged for the children's ready access.

                                                                                   

 A Boy Scout Eagle Project resulted in more shelving for the classroom.